Finch, E, (Ed.) (2011) Facillities change management. London: Wiley-Blackwell

Facilities change management Edited by Edward Finch, Wiley-Blackwell, London, 2011. ISBN 978-1-4051-5346-1, £44.99 (pb)

Publisher’s description: Modern organisations are subject to continual change – technologies evolve, organisational structures are modified, people and underlying cultures are transformed. Yet the facilities that organisations occupy are static and can impede the changes that are essential to organisational survival. The response to change in terms of property and support services is often too little too late – leading to facilities that do not support organisational reality. The facilities management team is thus constantly challenged to bridge the gap between what an organisation has and what it needs. Facilities Change Management is a practical evaluation of the management of change for facilities managers and related professions. It considers: the forces of change affecting facilities decisions; the obstacles to change at a resource level and human level; the effective implementation of change; the human aspect of change. Each of these is considered in relation to modern facilities management issues. The discussion will enable practising facilities managers, project managers, surveyors, service providers and architects to understand, engage with and manage facilities change effectively at a strategic level. Through real-life case studies it demonstrates the complexities of change and hidden elements of change that may undermine carefully planned projects.

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About Will

Professor of Construction Management and Economics, University of Reading, UK. Editor-in-Chief, Construction Management and Economics (1992-2016). Programme Director, MSc Construction Management. School Director of Postgraduate Teaching Programmes.
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